In 2015, the Girls Rock Santa Barbara program was sponsored by the Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation. Kenny Slaught knows that music inspires kids, and believe the foundation offers a setting to develop their creativity. The program involves music lessons, various workshops, and live performances. Students learn how to be open minded, question traditional gender roles, and work together. Girls Rock Santa Barbara continues Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation’s goal of making arts available to everyone.

Read more: http://finance.dailyherald.com/dailyherald/news/read/33663282/Kenny_Slaught_%E2%80%93_Raising_Awareness_of_Education_Outreach_Programs_at_the_Santa_Barbara_Bowl

Kenny Slaught thinks that Santa Barbara’s strong community comes from the residents’ commitment to charity. The town started its nonprofit activities in 1928. when the Santa Barbara Foundation was opened. The charity organizations prioritize the community’s needs, which requires less assistance from national foundations.

Read more: http://profitandcost.com/news/kenny-slaught-examines-santa-barbara-s-thriving-community/0004694/

The Spanish Colonial Revival architecture style was started at the beginning of the 20th century. The style was first used in the Spanish colonies that later were turned into American cities. It is often found in California, and Santa Barbara adopted it following the 1925 quake. Originally, the movement was started by architect George Washington Smith who relocated to Montecito and made it popular. The constructions in El Pueblo Viejo remind of ancient Rome and Paris, and maintain its historical roots. Spanish architecture comes from Andalusia, and in Santa Barbara, its influence is a result of the available materials with the natural environment. Kenny Slaught says this architecture comes from simplicity and great craftsmanship. The city’s structures are sun oriented, and the predominant colors are orange, white, red and yellow. 

Read more: http://markets.financialcontent.com/mng-lang.dailynews/news/read/34182503/Kenny_Slaught_

Kenny Slaught mentions that Hoover Dam was built during the Great Depression, from 1931 to 1936, for no less than $49 million. Although named Boulder Dam at first, its name was changed to Hoover Dam to honor President Herbert Hoover who was a main contributor. The large structure can generate over 4,2 billion kWh 2 in a year, and has a 35.000 cubic kilometers total capacity. It is 221 meters high and 379 meters long. 

Read more: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kenny-slaught-societal-importance-hoover-230600215.html