Many therapists at Hospice of Santa Barbara started using EMDR in their counseling sessions, due to how effective it is compared to talk therapy. While EMDR does not replace traditional therapy, it is more helpful for those dealing with grief and trauma. Kenny Slaught invites people who want to know more to visit HospiceOfSantaBarbara.org or contact the facility at (805) 563-8820.

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Architect George Washington Smith started the Spanish Colonial revival style nearly a century ago. He left Harvard to work in bond trading, and moved to Santa Barbara later for retirement. But, he was surprised at how much the locals liked the house he built and decided to continue designing for the city. He fused old styles with new ones, and brought authentic materials from Spain for his designs. Smith’s buildings are known for their gorgeous yet simple style. He became one of the Santa Barbara founding fathers, with many new artists following his lead. Kenny Slaught acknowledges the attentive eye that is requires to design such beautiful pieces.

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The campaign and renovations will last for 6 years, during which the museum will stay open to visitors. Kenny Slaught says that the 4 main objectives of the project are increasing gallery and community space, providing a better museum experience for guests and focusing on what the building needs most. He says that people can donate cash on the Imagine More website at campaign.sbma.net. Stock and securities, as well as real estate are accepted means of donation. All of these will help the campaign keep going through the restoration process.

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Kenny Slaught, real estate expert, supports Hospice of Santa Barbara’s numerous counseling programs. These support families who had painful experiences find the joy of life again by practicing self care. Slaught promotes the Hospice of Santa Barbara’s Anticipatory Grief Services program as he showcases the importance of social support. This is crucial for those who lost a loved one. With keeping this mind, Slaught advertised these initiatives on his blog at KennySlaught.com.

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The service and hospitality industry offers many job opportunities and good salaries. It also enables students to improve their skills and reach their goals of becoming a top hotel administrator, chef or manager. The SBCC provides a Culinary Arts and Hotel Management program that is varied and focuses on all aspects of the service industry. Perfecting such skills can aid graduates in finding local or international jobs. Kenny Slaught also mentions how the program helps people start their own successful company.

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Central Santa Barbara shows those who are interested how its architecture came to be. The way the buildings are designed and their details helps viewers understand more about Hispanic architecture. The roofs have a colonial style and remind of the ones in  Cartagena, Mompox and San Juan in Puerto Rico. Santa Barbara stays committed to preserving its architecture, and implemented laws that prevent new buildings from interfering with the style of the old ones. In El Pueblo Viejo, the guidelines are especially strict. Kenny Slaught recognizes the city’s effort to maintain its Spanish architecture, even when it doesn’t fit the American trends brought by the British presence in the region.

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Kenny Slaught explains that intuitive software and mobile apps allow builders and investor to find a larger selection of properties easier. The Jumpstart Our Business Startup (JOBS) Act, adopted in 2012, drove crowdfunding projects to success. In the real estate sector, the act changed the way funders support property acquisitions and development. The new law made it possible to ask for donations from accredited individuals and firms. Individuals with a net worth of $1,000,000 without their home, or a yearly income of $200,000 can become accredited investors. Those with a shared income of 300,000 can also become an investor if they file with a spouse. These changes enabled borrowers and lenders to engage in debt and equity financing, which results in profit made from loans without a bank being involved. The internet allowed homeowners and sponsors to view the available investments, perform due diligence and track their assets.

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The support services at the hospice help many families, Kenny Slaught says. The therapy sessions are free and address the   emotional, mental, and spiritual well-being of those who struggle with a loss. Those who are unable to visit the center are offered other safe locations around the city. Early therapy sessions reduce the risk of unresolved grief showing up years later, according to studies. Furthermore, specialized grief counseling is more effective than traditional therapy.

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The early 20th century brought a new architecture style called the Spanish Colonial Revival. Its inspiration came from the former Spanish colonies that were turned into American cities later on. The style can often be found in California, and was used in redesigning the city after the 1925 quake. Architect George Washington Smith moved to Montecito and made it popular. El Pueblo Viejo’s architecture reminds of that of old Paris and Rome. The aim is to preserve history through the Hispanic buildings in a style mostly encountered in Southern Spain. In Santa Barbara both the environment and the materials found locally, helped create these vernacular buildings. Kenny Slaught points out that the Hispanic architecture of the region can be described as “simple, rustically economic, with an outstanding craftsmanship and with an honest expression of materials.” The forms of the Santa Barbara region are functional and face the sun. The surroundings are reflected in the colors used as well: shades of red, yellow, white and orange.

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